nullstream weblog - August 2009

The case against Apple

Apple

August 9, 2009 03:16 PM PST

The Case Against Apple-in Five Parts

The article is pretty good, but I really got a kick out of the comments. I found this one part way down:


If Microsoft managed the Windows PC world the way Apple manages the iPhone/iPod touch world, Apple’s revenue would be less than half of what it is today. Imagine:

Steve: Hi, we’ve just submitted the Windows version of our iTunes app to the Windows app store.

Bill: Interesting. It looks like it duplicates existing functionality of the Windows OS, which includes Windows Media Player. Rejected.

Steve: What? There are similarities, yes, but iTunes provides a clean, easy to use interface for managing, purchasing, and playing music. Further, it allows Windows users to connect their iPods to their PCs and sync their music library seamlessly.

Bill: Sorry, our policy still stands. Besides, third party applications aren’t allowed direct access to music stored on a user’s PC.

Steve: But then how will we revolutionize the portable media player market and the mobile phone market, boosting our Mac market share and making billions of dollars in the process?

Bill: You won’t.

I wonder what revolutionary apps/gear/services we’ll miss out on because Apple finds them inconvenient.

-lang

There are also some good comparisons betweens Microsoft's anti-trust case for 'including' I.E. and Apple's down right 'rejection' of competing browsers like Opera mobile.

I'm enjoying the negative press Apple is getting, because hey I'm sick that way. But in the end I just want them to open things up a bit, and stop being, you know, evil.

Before you spam me, let me state that I do realize that the iPhone is not an open platform and they have the right to do what ever they want with 'their' product. I think the point being made in the market however is that consumers really want it to be open. Now I'm no business major, but I think that sometimes, just sometimes, it is a good idea to give customers what they want.


Comments (3)

traceroute + ping = mtr

Hacking

August 5, 2009 01:35 PM PST

Matt at Twitter turned me on to using mtr. It's a mix of traceroute and ping, and produces a nice little list of where your packets are going.

The source tarball of mtr compiles fine on Mac OS X with a simple "make". I typically avoid "make install", and rather just copied the executable to /usr/sbin and did a setuid so it will run without typing "sudo" first.

$ wget ftp://ftp.bitwizard.nl/mtr/mtr-0.75.tar.gz
$ make
$ sudo cp mtr /usr/sbin
$ sudo chmod +s /usr/sbin/mtr
$ mtr www.google.com
                            My traceroute  [v0.75]
xxxxxxxx-macbook-pro.local (0.0.0.0)                  Wed Aug  5 13:19:34 2009
Keys:  Help   Display mode   Restart statistics   Order of fields   quit
                                       Packets               Pings
 Host                                Loss%   Snt   Last   Avg  Best  Wrst StDev
 1. 192.168.0.1                       0.0%    37    0.8   0.8   0.7   0.9   0.0
 2. xx.xxx.xx.xx                      0.0%    37    2.2   2.3   2.0   4.4   0.5
 3. xxx.xxx.xx.xxx                    2.7%    37    3.7   3.7   3.3   5.7   0.5
 4. xx.x.xxx.xxx                     11.1%    36    7.3  11.2   6.7  67.7  12.1
 5. xxxxxxxxxxx.sea.eschelon.com      8.3%    36    7.0   9.0   6.8  58.7   9.0
 6. xxx.xxx.xx.xx                     5.6%    36    7.3  12.4   7.0 102.7  16.9
 7. xxxxxxxxxx.sttlwawb.integra.net   2.8%    36    7.4  15.3   7.0 129.9  23.4
 8. six.sea01.google.com              5.6%    36    7.5  14.8   7.1  89.1  18.2
...
13. xxxxxxxxxx.google.com             5.6%    36   14.8  16.4  14.4  33.7   4.4

Yes, that is some packet loss :-)

Comments (2)